Cardiovision – Patient Instructions

In order to achieve the most accurate measurements and to prevent false readings, please read and follow the instructions listed below.

A blood pressure cuff will be placed around your left upper arm. It is best positioned directly on the bare skin, but can be placed over thin sleeved apparel. Thicker fabrics can cause errors and must be removed or an examination gown put on. Do not roll up your shirt or jacket sleeve, since this can cause constriction in the upper arm and prevent an accurate reading.

For about 5 minutes prior to the test, you should relax, have feet flat on the floor, palm up, and forearm at heart level or as positioned by the technician. Breathe normally. Measurement of cardiovascular dynamics and blood pressure will vary as the arm position, muscle tension, breathing pattern, and other factors are changed.

For reliable results, avoid talking, moving (no finger lifting or gum chewing) and coughing, before and during the measurement.

The cuff will automatically inflate as the test begins. Although this may produce some discomfort, it is minor and very short in duration. Generally, 5 measurements are made with a 2-3 minute rest between each measurement. Continue to remain quiet and relatively motionless between readings.

Additional measurements may be performed if there appears any inaccurate or false values. If you have an arrhythmia, please notify the technician as readings may fluctuate and may need to be repeated. An average ASI (Arterial Stiffness Index) is calculated from the multiple measurements.

Dr. Swetlikoff will review the results and explain their meaning and significance to you.

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    Coffee…Not All Bad!

    beverage, breakfast, brewed coffee

     Coffee: As one of the most consumed beverages in the world, coffee data continues to evolve.
    Research is shedding new light on the benefits of regular, but moderate coffee consumption. Here are a few highlights….

    Coffee is loaded with antioxidants and polyphenols that quench “bad” free radicals. Also, a reasonable source of vitamins B1, B5, B3 and minerals magnesium, manganese, and potassium.

    Caffeine certainly contributes to many of the properties we associate with coffee. It can increase energy, memory, mood, reaction time and physical performance. It inhibits the brain chemical adenosine, which makes us sleepy and relaxed, but increases dopamine and norepinephrine, which are “feel good” chemicals. Caffeine stimulates fat burning and increases metabolism by 3-10 %. Consequently, it is found in all supplement “fat burners”.

    Coffee has been shown to reduce the risk of getting some diseases. They are: type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s and dementia, Parkinson’s, liver cirrhosis, depression, stroke and liver/colorectal/prostate and uterine cancers.

    Not all people do well with coffee. Some are allergic to the roasted bean, which can cause stomach cramping, diarrhea, headaches and just a sense of feeling unwell. Others, it may temporary raise blood pressure and heart rate, increase anxiety and restlessness and worsen insomnia. Coffee should not be drunk late at night and ideally, not when pregnant.

    Dark roast coffee has less caffeine in it than lighter roasts. Drip coffee has more caffeine in it than espresso. Black coffee is best, minus the sugar, dairy products and flavorings.

    Buy high quality, fresh, organic whole beans when possible. Grind the beans before use. Like all things in life, moderation is best.

     

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